Over the last decade, I have been amazed at the number of new licensees to amateur radio. To date, there are over 776,000 licensed ham radio operators in the United States and approximately 3,000,000 worldwide. No doubt, by the numbers, the amateur radio service is strong. In Colorado, we are just shy of 20,000 licensed amateur radio operators. What is equally exciting behind the numbers is that with over 250 members, the PRA has roughly 1.25% of Colorado hams as members; not too shabby for an 8-year old group. What is also noticeable is that with 250 members, we get roughly 10% participating in nets and being active on our repeaters. Although not discouraged or disappointed in the numbers, I reflect back on when I was first licensed and what it took for me to break the threshold of feeling comfortable being on the local repeater routinely. Breaking that barrier took time, talent and treasures from a lot of fellow ham radio operators.

The buffet of options for newly licensed hams is something that I do not envy. When I was licensed in 1992, handheld digital modes like DMR, DStar, and Fusion were non-existent options. If you wanted a handheld radio, you operated analog. At that time, handhelds were mostly single band, but the emergence of dual band radio was slowly becoming more popular. Even with a dual band radio, analog was the only option. The great pains of programming radios without software was relatively simple with offsets and CTCSS codes being the only true elements needed to program your radio successfully. I lived for getting the hand-me-down of the ARRL repeater book from my Elmers to make sure I had my radio programmed with as much up-to-date information as possible. Yes, this was before the internet and readily available repeater directories online.

Fast forward to today and the plethora of handheld radio options are enough to make your head spin. Dual band, Tri-band, dual mode, analog/digital, DMR, Fusion, P25, D-Star. Now, add the programming logics of each that are independent by each mode and I can begin to see where today’s newest hams face a much steeper learning curve than what I faced 30-years ago. This, too, may also represent a barrier of getting on the air for the newest hams. With that, I am proud of the PRA membership that have stepped up to help new hams as an Elmer (a term used for those that help teach amateur radio). The monthly PRA Elmer Nights are a great venue for the newly licensed or returning ham to get up-to-speed and get questions answered on how to do certain things such as which radio is a good starter handheld, what programming software to use, what is a repeater, to name a few. This is also a great venue on how to make your first contact and how to check-in on a net. For many, checking in on a net is as simple as tying your shoes, but remember learning to tie your shoes? I remember the patience that both my parents provided during that learning curve. They guided me with patience, practice and mentoring to help me master the art of a sustainable shoelace tied well. The same premise and opportunity exists in amateur radio.

As outside activities are picking up and we are on the month-eve of our capstone event for the year, ARRL Field Day, may we have the courage to ask for help and guidance and may we also have the courage to share our time, talent, and treasures with our fellow amateur radio operators. Breaking those barriers generate benefits far beyond what we can see at that moment.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

Coming up on my 30th ham radio licensing anniversary, I remain amazed at how dramatically technology has changed in some aspects, and remains the same in others. There is equal fascination in the technological advancement of computer interfacing, digital modes, internet linking and software defined radios (SDR) with one of the first of communication methods in morse code (which is gaining additional popularity year after year). Having an appreciation of the basics of radio operating with the pursuit of technological advancement is what make amateur radio great. No doubt, for the new amateur radio operator, there are a plethora of options.

Having such a wide range of options can be overwhelming, even for the 30-year ham veteran. As amateur radio is both a service and a hobby, the hobbyist side of me wants to try it all and try it all right away. However, I quickly realize that I spin my wheels, both from an appreciation standpoint and a financial standpoint. Taking my time in wanting to try something new has helped me gain not only a better appreciation for the technology, but has allowed me to truly understand and master how it all works. No matter if you are programming your first analog radio, learning (or continually re-learning) morse code, or tinkering with a Raspberry Pi SDR receiver, trying to do it all at once can get frustrating quickly. A colleague of mine that was in the military taught me some sage advice, “sometimes you have to slow down to speed up.” How true those words are when we look at all that is available within amateur radio.

One key aspect behind all this learning is having the bravery of asking for help. At our fingertips, we have wonderful resources like YouTube that provide instructional videos. However, learning in-person and having that one/one contact takes learning to another level, both for the instructor, and the learner. No matter if you are licensed for 3-months or 30-years, asking for help should be an easy and non-embarrassing process. Nothing is more frustrating than hearing, “you know, that was on the Technician exam,” when someone asks for help. As our fellow sisters and brothers in amateur radio ask for our insight and guidance, it is a special opportunity to exhaust and showcase our unique time, talent, and treasures. That simple ask of assistance may make or break someone’s future in amateur radio. I know that I never want to be the curmudgeon that destroys someone’s interest because I did not help them when asked.

As our activities pick up with our upcoming Field Day, portable operation outings, and Wings-Over-The-Rockies, may we continue to be aware of our influence. May we error on the side of slowing down to speed up someone’s learning and appreciation of amateur radio. Being cognitively aware that we have the ability to wonderfully share our time, talent and treasures will only continue to promote the amateur radio service in such a way that people say, “I want to do that.”

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

One of the great aspects of amateur radio is the outreach. Like any mission, creating and executing to an outreach takes individual and collective time, talent and treasures. When you ask longtime amateur radio operators about outreach, many will mention missions like ARES (and all it encompasses), Volunteer Examiner Testing, or community events like parades, bicycle events or Scouting showcases. Each of these are excellent examples of the amateur radio service in action and are absolutely valuable to our communities and outreach. As we continually face opportunities to introduce amateur radio, having a couple amateur radio ‘elevator speeches’ is important to capture interest because one message does not fit all.

Professionally, I am fortunate enough to oversee four manufacturing teams in three states with approximately 150 direct and indirect reports in total. In my walks and interactions with individual employees, if I delivered the same exact wording in every interaction, my message would be stale. I have to treat each individual as such and gain a sense of what excites them about their role and what interests they have outside of our company. Getting that insight, for each individual, gives opportunity to interlace aspects of the company needs and mission with their talents. Individualizing and recognizing talents with our manufacturing vision allows people to use their creativity. When creativity is unlocked in a safe environment where people are given ‘permission to play,’ and permission to fail, curiosity and enthusiasm builds.

If you have attended any PRA presentation at a monthly meeting or Elmer Night, nearly every presenter will happily admit their project shortcomings, failures, and lessons learned. I am also blown away at how our presenters capture the entire audience, not just the 30+ year enthusiast that can solder in the dark and in their sleep. Our presenters capture the attention of not only the 30+ year enthusiast down to those that never touched a radio, but are curious about this amateur radio thing.

Knowing our future audience is important. Many new licensees dive into amateur radio for emergency communication opportunities. That serves a valuable service in all of our communities. Grade school youth dive into amateur radio typically through encouragement from a family member or teacher that got them hooked. However, there is another key young adult target age range (say 18-30) that may be seeking more from their STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) programs in high school and college. As my children are in this age range, they come at this world completely differently than I did. They know raspberry pi’s, 3D Printers and robotics (Google Search the Makers Movement), where I knew 5.25″ boot discs. They are very hands on with technology, programming and coding. Ever see a 18 year old without a cell phone?

Speaking of coding, my oldest daughter, a Clinical Psychology major, sent me a text screenshot of a coding assignment that she was working on for one of her electives. When I asked her to describe it to me and how she liked it, she said walked me through her assignment and said it was “cool and very systematic.” It looked like a foreign language to me, but it dawned on me…this is how the amateur radio service can interlace interests in these young adults. When I told her about how amateur radio pulls similar type coding data into raspberry pi builds for worldwide communications, my daughter said, “next time I’m home, please show me.” Now, Dad the ham radio nerd may actually become ‘cool’ again.

Amateur radio will never be a one-size fits all service/hobby. If it ever was, I would not any part of it. However, as we learn what people like about amateur radio or what their initial interests of amateur radio may be, we can cater our message to our next individual licensed operator.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

As virtually all athletes or sports fans will tell you, getting an early lead is important. Going into 2022, we welcomed several newly elected Board members and appointed a Board Chair. Usually, with a new group, it takes some time for things to get into motion and the team to synchronize. If there is any one early observation, the leadership of the PRA has hit the ground running and has our team out to an early lead in 2022. Like any goal, getting off to a good start is important; getting off to a great start sets the stage for some amazing accomplishments along this year’s journey.

In reflecting on the PRA’s growth in membership during the pandemic, we attempted to pinpoint what made the most impact to drive our membership growth. Very quickly, it became abundantly clear that by having virtual meetings that were directly tied to YouTube Live gave us an edge. What was also evident was that we realized the right people were in the right positions to be bold enough share a vision of bringing our meetings online easily, while looking like we had our act together. When vision is combined with passion and a little bit of research great things happen. Our CTO, Jeff-AB0L shared his vision of bringing our meetings onto YouTube easily, professionally, and at minimal cost. Through his research and consultation with other members that had some familiarity with the equipment he researched, the decision was easy and the execution looked flawless. Although, if you ask Jeff, he will say it was far from flawless, but in my opinion, he made it look not only effortless behind the camera and at the controls, but the finished product was pure quality.

What is also important is the impact and ask for participation in the PRA’s activities. At the forefront, the PRA belongs to its members and it is the members that drive decisions in the organization. Even though we have a Board and Officers, their respective positions are to serve the members while guiding and guarding the organization. Last month, we actively pursued Committee Chairs to lead smaller groups to drive impact in areas of importance; New Members & Elmering, Repeaters, Website, Special Events, and Field Day. Members that are passionate about these particular areas were quick to jump at the opportunity to lead these initiatives. It goes without saying that by giving back, we receive so much in return. Thank you to those that took the chance at leading a committee – you are an tremendous asset to the PRA.

Last, but most importantly, a healthy percentage of our members are getting plugged into one or more committees. If you are passionate about one of these aspects of amateur radio, we need your time, talent and treasures. Maybe you want to learn more about what these committees focus upon…there is no better way to learn and get plugged in than participating in something new. A collection of small efforts quickly add up to great momentum and amazing outcomes. Thank you to those members that have joined a committee early in the year. By the way, it is never too early to join a committee.

Giving our our time, talent and treasures brings us so much in return. As a group that is passionate about amateur radio, any amount given of your time and talent typically leads to treasure for others. If you want to see this first hand, check out the amazing presentations given by Brad-AB4BA. If you want to see time and talent become treasures, come to an Elmer Night. If you want to see more of this first hand, come and participate in one of our committee events. You never know the impact you can have on yourself and new or future amateur radio operators by the simple acts of sharing our own time, talent and treasures. We are off to a great start and early lead in 2022…amazing accomplishments are happening.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

As we embark on a New Year, we often find ourselves setting many goals. Some of these goals are financially focused, others are focused on personal health, while other goals revolve around how we interact and treat other people in our thoughts, words and deeds. For me, there are countless resolutions that fit many of these categories as it is important that we take the time to do some self inventory and pinpoint what aspect(s) of our lives we want to improve. For most of us, we are given about 30,000 days on this earth and it is important to realize that your gift of time is unique because you are the only one who can give it.

From an amateur radio standpoint, I find myself consistently wanting to improve my CW copy speed. Now, this has been a resolution of mine for a few years now. As I look back at my attempts to improve, one thing is common; I was not consistent in the Time that I spent learning, studying and practicing. The element of Time…how precious it is, even when we want to give more towards our own improvement. I look at amateur radio as a type of pilgrimage; each day, each week, each month and each year, I need to be progressive on our pilgrimage and we cannot do this unless we give some time. Not only for ourselves, but assisting individuals and organizations is another way to share our gift of Time. If you have never attended a PRA meeting or Elmer Night, this is the quickest way to see your fellow ham radio operators sharing their Time to assist others and build upon our wonderful organization.

All of us have special Talents or gifts. These Talents and gifts are not given to us just for our own use, but are given to us for the enrichment of the lives of others. If you have a Talent for soldering, have you ever shown someone how to solder and watch them as they successfully solder a resistor, J-Pole, or PL-259? The magic of learning begins with the magic of teaching and teaching comes from a mastery of unique gifts that we are given. Sharing your Talents builds common good and through this opportunity of common good, friendships develop. Putting ourselves at the service of others makes us good stewards to the amateur radio service.

Sharing our gifts of Treasure, we do make the most of our material possessions. As an example, take a look at the PRA repeaters that have gone up in the last year. Our repeater system is an example of material possessions (like equipment and money) being put to use. Now, it takes more than just Treasure to get repeaters on the air. Yes, it takes time and talent to bring all three elements together. The PRA also shares its Treasures of three loaner HF rigs for our members. These HF rigs are some of the latest in the market and give our members the opportunity to not only get on the air, but to put our Treasures to use. Your gift of treasure is a direct gift that only you can give. I can attest that when I give to the PRA, I get so much more in return.

Time, talent and treasures are what make the PRA special. The collective efforts of individuals that are fanatical about amateur radio showcase our abilities and demonstrate the potential that others may not necessarily see in themselves. What time, talent and treasures do you plan to share with your fellow amateur radio community? Maybe a presentation or giving a new member a simple welcome and note of encouragement…it does not take something radical or revolutionary to have an impact, particularly when we freely share our Time, Talent, and Treasures to make amateur radio better today than it was yesterday.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

As we wrap up another amazing year for the Parker Radio Association, we have climbed back to our known activities. From monthly face-to-face meetings and Elmer Nights to Field Days, portable deployments, Special Event stations and Wednesday group lunches, it is easy to take for granted just how far we have advanced in 2021. As our membership continues to grow, it is a constant reminder that this organization belongs to the members and it is the members that make it strong, thriving, active and fun! It simply takes one or two members to come up with a simple idea, put it into action, and watch amazing things happen. These simple suggestions lead to a snowball effect, where one great idea is surrounded by more great ideas that slowly build momentum. As the momentum builds, so does the snowball; it gets bigger and bigger with the more encouragement, traction and involvement it fosters.

One key trait of the PRA, as it continues to grow, is that our culture has never lost its focus of feeling like an organization you have always belonged to. Fostering and maintaining a welcome and friendly atmosphere is at the core of who we are as an organization and it permeates the airwaves as well. I am amazed at the number of new hams and members that have found the PRA and are warmly greeted on any one of our repeaters. With the ease of technology, it is important that we exercise our spectrum privileges not only on HF, but VHF and UHF as well. Getting on the air is one thing, but getting on the air and having a great conversation, learning something new and making new contacts and friends is a whole other level. Simply put, it takes all of us to welcome the new member at a meeting, answering the call on a repeater of a unfamiliar callsign, and encouraging participation in the amateur radio service. Each of us in in control of creating an amazing snowball effect in amateur radio that can compound into great things.

As we wrap up 2021 and welcome 2022, I am honored to serve as your President for the next two years. I have been fortunate to be surrounded by amazing people that are far more talented than myself. For our outgoing Board, Patrick-AI8C, Elizabeth-N1RDH, Justin-AE2L, John-N4SJW, Ray-N0KEG, and Wayne-N0AD, thank you for your service, dedication, enthusiasm and making decisions that benefited the PRA membership and amateur radio. Each of you brought your time, talent and treasures during the most difficult time of the PRA’s short history. You navigated us graciously and have set the stage for continued success in the years and decades to come. To our newest (and returning) Board members taking their seats in January 2022, Paul-AC5S, Brian-K0FBS, Robert-AE0CA, Randy-K0TNG, Jeff-AB0L, and Scott-AK6Q – I’m excited to continue to build upon the snowball that has started.

We all have a great opportunity to offer up our time, talent and treasures in 2022. Committees will need chaired, committees will need members and the organization will need your active participation. We have some great things planned in 2022 with more group activities, special events, public service, and educational activities. It simply takes one or two members to come up with a simple idea, put it into action, and watch amazing things happen. These simple suggestions lead to a snowball effect, where one great idea is surrounded by more great ideas that slowly build momentum. As the momentum builds, so does the snowball; it gets bigger and bigger with the more encouragement, traction and involvement it fosters. Get involved and get active!

Hopefully we’ll start seeing some actual snow soon.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

November is one of my favorite months of the year. In particular, the celebration of Thanksgiving typically involves amazing preplanning, preparation, a day’s long cooking of delicacies, and more food consumed than I care to admit. Throw in the necessary football games and numerous naps in between the family discussions and activities; it is easy to see why this flurry of activity is relaxing and enjoyable. Within the PRA, Thanksgiving is not exclusive to a Thursday in November. We celebrate Thanksgiving weekly.

Over the last year and a half, the PRA navigated a critical time in its short history with the global pandemic. We remained committed to be engaged with members and were versatile in shifting monthly meetings and presentations to an online video conference with YouTube recording and backup. With our amazing committees, we were able to keep the momentum going in adding several repeaters, upgrading equipment, and increasing our loaner equipment. As we crawled out of shutdowns and isolation, it felt as if the PRA never missed a beat. In fact, as of this writing, we 237 members, of which, we are not only thankful for, but we are extremely fortunate that 237 amateur radio operators put their trust in membership with the PRA.

Weekly Thanksgiving comes in the form of our on-the-air nets. There is no better way to stay on top of the PRA activities than participating in our nets. Frankly, it is a great way to exercise the precious resources of our amateur radio spectrum that we have been assigned. Getting on the air not only improves your listening and copying skills, but you’ll also get a sense of how well your equipment is operating. Of utmost importance, our nets are a great way to ask questions, gain insight, and share information in your amateur radio journey. No matter where you are in your amateur radio journey, the PRA is thankful for you and will meet you where you are.

Going into the end of 2021, your PRA Board of Directors will have several new faces. Congratulations to Paul-AC5S (Vice President), Scott-AK6Q (At-Large), Randy-K0TNG (At-Large), Jeff-AB0L (Chief Technology Officer), Brian-K0FBS (Secretary) and Robert-AE0CA (Treasurer) on their election to the PRA Board for 2022-2023. Your willingness to say “yes” is a testament to your impact on the PRA and reaching beyond. The giving of your time, talent, and treasures is what will carry the PRA in the years to come. Again, congratulations.

For the current Board of Directors; Elizabeth-N1RDH, Patrick-AI8C, Justin-AE2L, Wayne-N0AD, Ray-N0KEG, and John-N4SJW – your individual and collective efforts over the last two years have not only built the PRA, but you have driven our organization through a global pandemic and set it up for success. To grow our membership as we have the last two years is nothing short of amazing. Most importantly, I appreciate the insight you have given me. Through constructive rumbles, we never lost sight of what was important in our decisions – doing what is best for the organization. Your guidance, drive, and support of the PRA is very special and one that I am extremely thankful for today, tomorrow, and into the future.

There is a lot to be thankful for within the PRA, especially through membership and participation in a committee or as a committee chair. Giving of your time, talent, and treasures is more rewarding than you probably realize. I can assure you that as you give, the more you receive. As we embark on the Thanksgiving feast, know how thankful we are to you and what you bring to the PRA and the amateur radio service. See you on the air!

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

Daylight is getting shorter and the dark of night joins our typically bright early mornings that we experience in the Summer. There is crisp air in the mornings and evenings. The season has changed and soon, the time will change as well. Shorts and tee-shirts will soon be replaced with long pants and jackets. All of these changes, as predictable as they are, come with a level of excitement, anticipation, and preparedness.

As the seasons have changed, one season that is familiar with many amateur radio operators is Contest Season. As we get closer to November, several popular contests are on the horizon over the next few months. Contests can be as active or passive as YOU want them to be. If you have never participated in an amateur radio contest, you are in great company because those that enthusiastic and active in contesting all started where you are today. For me, I would say that I am a casual contester. If, and only if, family and professional duties are covered will I participate. At the same time, there are many contests that I have only operated late at night and/or early in the morning to ensure that I am present for my family. When it comes to contests, you control the level of activity and seriousness.

A couple aspects of amateur radio that I learned in contesting remains important in all my amateur radio activities. First, be patient with yourself and other operators. Like my golf game, I received great advice on the course many years ago where I was told, “you’re not that good to get that upset with yourself.” A nice slice of humble pie was served and remembered like it was yesterday. As fast paced as contests can be, remember, you are in control of your pace, nobody else. Secondly, listen, listen, listen. As what will sound like alphabet soup on the voice or CW, listening is underrated and typically not utilized very well. Listening will give you a couple of insights. First, you’ll want to understand the the exchange (and exchange is an information receipt and send between both operators to get a good contact). Along with listening, you’ll get a cadence of the operator you’re trying to contact. Do they answer at the beginning, middle, or end of the pile-up? Knowing the cadence of the Big Gun or DX entity will give you a better shot as to when you should drop your callsign to score that contact. There are so many other aspects of contesting that are important; these were the two that I felt were most important in my contest journey.

Bottom line, contesting should be fun! For your first contest, set an obtainable goal. Maybe your goal is 25 contacts; excellent! Work towards achieving it and if you do, add another five contacts to your goal. I like going back to my previous year contest to see if I can beat my previous year score and number of contacts. Also, I enjoy some friendly competition with friends from different parts of the country on the number of contacts made. My friendly wagers usually cost me a dinner or two throughout the year, but it is well worth it for the fun of the competition with friends.

With the season of change, cooler weather, and shorter daylight hours, get ready for some excitement in amateur radio contests. You’ll be amazed at how setting obtainable goals will help you not only enjoy the fun of on-the-air contests, but you’ll see your progress carry over to other other aspects of the amateur radio service. If you have not worked a contest, but want to do so, let us know! Our team is here to help you along your amateur radio journey.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

One of the most rewarding aspects I have had in the Parker Radio Association has been serving the membership as President. The role, as well as the opportunity, has helped form me in ways that have helped me personally and professionally. At the same time, I am a firm believer that every good leader surrounds themselves with people much smarter than they are and I have been fortunate that every member of the PRA Board and Committee Chairs in the past eight years has fulfilled that mission of intelligence surrounding. Serving in a leadership position within any organization requires passion, integrity, empathy, and the will to have fun through the process.

This month, the membership will go through the nomination process to identify and select candidates that we have the confidence that can manage the organization, but also lead our group beyond what we can see in the here and now. If you have ever wanted to be a part of the leadership team, this is your opportunity. Over the few weeks, you will see regular emails in our blasts and from Brad, W0BDT, our Election Chairperson. Brad, along with Bill, W0SUN and Alan, AC0F, will overseeing the nomination and election. In these regular updates, a summary of each position is detailed, as you have started to see in the weekly email blasts. The best part of the PRA, if you want to know more about a particular position, all you have to do is ask the current holder. As you have hopefully experienced, we are a very transparent organization and we promote learning, teaching, and leadership in the amateur radio service.

Maybe you are not quite ready for a Board position; that is absolutely understandable. However, maybe you have a passion for one of the PRA committees like the Repeater Committee or Elmer Committee. The Committee Chairs not only work closely with the PRA Board, but it is in these committees where the magic happens and “stuff” gets done. The PRA Board is not in place to make all the decisions; the Board is in place to guide and guard the organization. If decisions were made only from the top, we certainly would not have as much fun as we have the last eight years. At the same time, we would never have accomplished what we have done in a relatively short period of time. If you have a passion and interest in leading a PRA Committee going into 2022, let it be known!

The State of the PRA is strong and it is strong because of the amazing members that are passionate in giving of their time, talent and treasures. Going into nomination and election season, take stock in the importance of this process and if you are giving consideration for a position on the Board or Committee, make it known so that you are given all the encouragement and support possible. During this time, may we all embrace the passion, integrity, empathy and will to serve our membership happily, with a spirit of fun, and simply do the right things for our organization.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association

It is truly an exciting time to be a member of the Parker Radio Association. At each meeting, whether it is on-the-air or in-person, I am blown away with the spirit of fun and laughter that is coupled with giving spirit. At the core of the PRA is a culture and spirit of giving. It is through our spirit of giving that we put into action our time, talent and treasures to promote, share and encourage the amateur radio service to others.

Giving comes in so many different ways. Obviously, financial giving supports the organization and funds committee projects, club assets (like loaner equipment) and other PRA initiatives such as community work. Financial support is important in any organization and the PRA leadership takes that stewardship seriously in the use of our funds.

Another way of giving is participating in weekly nets. Yes, that simple act of checking in on a net and giving comments can spark revolutionary ideas for a fellow amateur radio operator. Recently, I have been bitten by the AllStar bug and I am looking forward to building my own AllStar node/hotspot and maybe even a repeater. This idea came through a few fellow PRA members comments on a net about AllStar. If it were not for those simple comments of “here is what I am working on in my shack…” I would have never given AllStar a glance.

Two monthly events, our in-person meetings and Elmer Night, give all PRA members opportunities to give back. At our in-person meetings, we experience a passionate member give a presentation on a topic pertinent to amateur radio. Also, with the influx of new members, it is great to see how we act as ambassadors to the service by welcoming our visitors and guests as if we have known them forever. Elmer Night is an amazing evening filled with no agenda other than, bring your questions, your talents, and resources. We thrive on learning and the promotion of learning in the amateur radio service because ham radio is a buffet; there is so much to choose from that sometimes it is hard to find a good place to start. That is where Elmer Night comes in for new, returning, or seasoned operators.

Another example of giving is by participating in a committee or seeking a Leadership/Board position in the PRA. With well over 230 members, the talent that we have, collectively, is astounding. You will not have to look hard, as I do every week, and find people that are smarter than us. Our committee are filled with smart, talented and amazing people; at the core, every committee needs help and support. As an example, if you do not know anything about repeaters, joining the Repeater Committee is a great place to learn and jump in with friendly, welcoming experts that will guide and teach you. From a Board standpoint, every two years, the PRA nominates a new Board and this upcoming Fall is our election year. To support the organization and its growth, fresh ideas and perspectives are healthy to have.

I know that I could go on and on about how the PRA members, collectively, drive what may be seen as simple into amazing outcomes. The spirit of giving is strong within the PRA and I love seeing this spirit that is supported by fun and laughter along the way. Putting our time, talent and treasures to use in promoting, sharing and encouraging the amateur radio service is what the PRA does best, daily.

73,
Dan – N2SRK
President
Parker Radio Association